"Nunca dudes que un grupo pequeño de ciudadanos comprometidos puedan ser capaces de cambiar al mundo, de hecho, ha sido lo único que lo ha cambiado."
(Margaret Mead)

domingo, 2 de octubre de 2011

Dossier legal hecho por HSLDA por familias en España

RESUMEN LEGAL

A FAVOR DE LA EDUCACIÓN EN EL HOGAR

__________________________________________________

HOME SCHOOL LEGAL DEFENSE ASSOCIATION

__________________________________________________

TABLA DE CONTENIDO

TABLA DE CONTENIDO.. ii

TABLA DE AUTORIDADES

ARGUMENTO.. 8

I. La educación en el hogar produce adultos maduros y bien socializados. 8

II. El Rendimiento Académico es Superior 14

Los Reportes Populares Concuerdan. 18

Rendimiento Universitario. 21

La Educación en el Hogar es Efectiva para Estudiantes con Necesidades Especiales. 23

III. La Educación en el Hogar es un Derecho Humano. 25

CONCLUSIÓN.. 29


TABLA DE AUTORIDADES

Otras Autoridades

Alan Scher Zagier, Colleges Coveting Home-Schooled Students, AP, September 30, 2006 15

Brian D. Ray Home educated and now adults: Their community and civic involvement, views about homeschooling, and other traits (Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute, 2004) 5, 6, 11

Brian D. Ray, A nationwide study of home education: Family characteristics, legal matters, and student achievement (Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute, 1990); Research Project. Home School Researcher, 6(4), 1-7; (1990)........................................................................................................... 8, 9

Brian D. Ray, Academic Achievement and Demographic Traits of Homeschool Students: A Nationwide Study, Academic Leadership Live: The Online Journal, 8 no. 1 (February 2010)...................... 8

Brian D. Ray, Home education in Oklahoma: Family characteristics, student achievement, and policy matters, National Home Education Research Institute (Salem, OR, 1992).................................. 9

Brian D. Ray, Home schooling: The ameliorator of negative influences on learning? Peabody Journal of Education 75(1 & 2), 71, 83, 90 (2000)...................................................................................... 9, 10

California Boy Wins National Spelling Bee,” CBS News, May 31, 2007......................... 12

California Home Schoolers Recognized in Space Day Competition, HSLDA News, July 8, 2002 13

Californian wins National Spelling Bee with ‘appoggiatura’, USA Today, June 1, 2005 12

Catherine E. Snow, Wendy S. Barnes, Jean Chandler, Irene F. Goodman, & Lowry Hemphill, Unfulfilled expectations: Home and school influences on literacy 2-3 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991)....................................................................................................................................... 10

Clive R Belfield, Home-schoolers: How well do they perform on the SAT for college admission? in Bruce S. Cooper (Ed.), Home schooling in full view: A reader (Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing; Galloway, 2005)....................................................................................................................................... 11

Colo. student wins spelling bee with ‘prospicience’, USA Today, May 31, 2002............. 13

Deani Van Pelt. The choices families make: Home schooling in Canada comes of age, Frasier Forum, March 2004......................................................................................................................................... 8

Eighth-grader from Dallas wins spelling bee, CNN.com, May 30, 2003.......................... 12

Elaine Regus, UC Riverside a leader in courting home-schooled students, The Press-Enterprise, November 23, 2007....................................................................................................................................... 16

Erika M. L. Jones, Transition from Home Education to Higher Education: Academic and Social Issues, Home School Researcher 25(3), 1-9, (2010)........................................................................................ 15

Gary Mason, Homeschool Recruiting: Lessons Learned on the Journey, Journal of College Admission 185 (Fall 2004), at 2...................................................................................................................... 14

Gary Neil Marks, Are father's or mother's socioeconomic characteristics more important influences on student performance? Recent international evidence. Social Indicators Research, 85(2), 293-309, (January 2008) 9

Georgina Gustin, Home-school numbers growing, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, October 3, 2007 16

Gordon Dahl & Lance Lochner, The impact of family income on child achievement. Discussion Paper No. 1305-05, Institute for Research on Poverty, 2005........................................................................ 10

Home Schoolers Making Headlines, NCHE, June 22, 2000............................................. 13

Homeschooler takes second place in national spelling bee, Washington DC Examiner, May 29, 2009 12

Howard B. Richman, William Girten, & Jay Snyder, Academic achievement and its relationship to selected variables among Pennsylvania homeschoolers, Home School Researcher, 6(4), 9, 13, (1990)...... 9

James S. Coleman & Thomas Hoffer, Public and private high schools: The impact of communities Chapter 5 (New York, NY: Basic Books, Inc, 1987).............................................................................. 10

Jennie F. Rakestraw, Home schooling in Alabama, Home School Researcher, 4(4), 1, 5 (1988) 9

Joan Ellen Havens, A study of parent education levels as they relate to academic achievement among home schooled children. Doctoral (Ed.D.) dissertation, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth TX (1991) 9

John Rogers, 10-year-old scholar takes Calif. college by storm, AP News, May 14, 2008 11

Jon Wartes, The relationship of selected input variables to academic achievement among Washington's homeschoolers. (Woodinville, WA, September 1990).................................................. 10

Lawrence M. Rudner, Scholastic achievement and demographic characteristics of home school students in 1998, Educational Policy Analysis Archives, 7(8). (1999)........................................ 8, 9, 10, 11

Mary Pride, What We Can Learn from the Home-schooled 2002 National Geography Bee Winners, Practical Home-schooling # 48, 2002...................................................................................................... 13

Minnesota Boy Is Spelling Champ, CBS News, May 31, 2001......................................... 13

National Geographic, “2000 Finalists,”............................................................................. 13

National Geographic, 2003 Winner: James Williams,....................................................... 12

National Geographic, Past National Geographic Bee Winners......................................... 12

Once Again Home-schoolers Score High on the ACT Exam, HSLDA, July 31, 2007..... 11

One-of-a-kind Tebow becomes first sophomore to win Heisman, AP article, December 10, 2007 14

Oregon Department of Education, Office of Student Services, Annual report of home school statistics 1998-99 (Salem, OR. May 20, 1999)............................................................................................. 8

Patrick Basham, John Merrifield & Claudia R. Hepburn, Home Schooling: From The Extreme To The Mainstream, 2nd ed 6, The Fraser Institute 2007.............................................................................. 15

Paul Jones & Gene Gloeckner, First-Year College Performance: A Study of Home School Graduates & Traditional School Graduates, Journal of College Admission 183 (Spr. 2004), at 17, 20......... 11, 14

Paula Wasley, Home-Schooled Students Rise in Supply and Demand, The chronicle of Higher Education 54(7), 1, (Oct. 12, 2007).............................................................................................................. 15

Rhonda A. Galloway & Joe P. Sutton, Home schooled and conventionally schooled high school graduates: A comparison of aptitude for and achievement in college English, Home School Researcher, 11(1), 1-9 (1995) 11

Rhonda A. Galloway, “Home Schooled Adults: Are They Ready for College?,” in American Educational Research Association (San Francisco: 1995)................................................................................... 6

Rich Jefferson, Home schooler wins third place in National Geography Bee, NCHE, May 23, 2001 13

Richard G. Medlin, Homeschooled Children’s Social Skills, Home School Researcher 17(1), 1-8, (2006) 8

Richard G. Medlin, The Question of Socialization, Peabody Journal of Education 75(1 & 2), 107-123, 117, (2000)..................................................................................................................................... 6, 7

Richard Sousa , On Education: Home-schooling is a viable alternative to public schools, San Francisco Chronicle, June 11, 2007................................................................................................................. 12

Sal Ruibal, Elite take home-school route, USA TODAY, June 7, 2005........................... 14

Scott Norris, Girl Wins Geographic Bee – First in 17 Years, National Geographic News, May 23, 2007 12

Scott White, et al., Emotional, Social & Academic Adjustment to College: A Comparison Between Christian Home Schooled & Traditionally Schooled College Freshman, Home School Researcher 17(4), 1-7, (2007) 7, 15

Scott White, Megan Moore, and Josh Squires, Examination of Previously Homeschooled College Students with the Big Five Model of Personality, Home School Researcher 25(1), 1-7, (2009).................. 7

Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee website, 2009 Results......................................... 12

Tanya K. Dumas, Sean Gates, & Deborah Schwarzer, “Evidence for Homeschooling: Constitutional Analysis in Light of Social Science Research,” Widener Law Review (forthcoming)....................... 4

Ten Students Win Places in National Geographic Bee Final, National Geographic News, May 24, 2005 12

Tennessee Department of Education. Tennessee statewide averages, home school student test results, Stanford Achievement Test, grades 2, 5, 7 and 9 (Nashville, TN, 1988)........................................ 8

Terry Russell, Cross-validation of a multivariate path analysis of predictors of home school student academic achievement, Home School Researcher, 10(1), 9, (1994).............................................. 10

Thomas C. Smedley, Socialization of Home School Children, Home School Researcher 8(3), 9-16, (1992) 6

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007, NCES 2009–030, December 2008........................................ 4, 12

Vancouver Olympics 2010 website, athlete profile of Shaun White................................ 14


Home School Legal Defense Association [La Asociación de Defensa Legal de Educación en el Hogar] es una organización internacional con más de 81,000 miembros en los 55 estados y territorios de Estados Unidos, el Distrito de Columbia, y 36 países. Tenemos a varias familias con membresía en España. Nuestra misión es proteger y promover el derecho de los padres de enseñar a sus hijos en casa. HSLDA ayuda a las familias que tienen membresía con nuestra organización a entender la ley de su estado o país, las representa en corte cuando es necesario, y aboga a nivel nacional y estatal a favor de sus intereses ante asambleas, asambleas legislativas, ministerios, y departamentos. Desde nuestra fundación en 1983, HSLDA ha estado en primera línea, defendiendo los derechos constitucionales y naturales de los padres de dirigir la educación de sus hijos por medio de la enseñanza en casa. HSLDA se ha involucrado en cientos de casos sobre la educación en el hogar y ayuda a resolver miles de contactos legales a nivel mundial. En Estados Unidos, la educación en casa ha crecido dramáticamente en años recientes, empezando con decenas de miles en los años 1980 hasta llegar a millones actualmente. Evidencia anecdótica sugiere que tal crecimiento también se está haciendo más visible alrededor del mundo.

El propósito de este escrito es dar un trasfondo y contexto de la educación en el hogar en Estados Unidos y en otros lugares, si se aplica, demostrando empíricamente que la educación en el hogar cumple las necesidades de desarrollo de los niños, y debe ser considerada, en su propio derecho, una forma equivalente, y en algunas maneras una forma superior, de educación. España tiene una tradición y una rica historia de ser una nación de leyes. Por la reputación que tiene España de ser una sociedad de gobierno de ley, estamos particularmente alarmados con el trato que los padres están recibiendo al escoger ejercitar sus derechos humanos naturales y así dirigir la educación de sus hijos a través de la educación en el hogar. La política nacional de España parece volverse más y más hostil a esta creciente forma de educación.

ARGUMENTO

I. La educación en el hogar produce adultos maduros y bien socializados

La educación en el hogar ciertamente se ha convertido en un movimiento mundial en la última década y está ganando popularidad alrededor del mundo, atravesándose de Norteamérica a Sudamérica y expandiéndose en Europa, África, y Asia. En Estados Unidos en particular, la educación en el hogar ha crecido rápidamente desde los años 1980, y especialmente en esta última década. “El aumento en el porcentaje de educación en el hogar (de 1.7 por ciento en el año 1999 a 2.2 por ciento en el año 2003 a 2.9 por ciento en año 2007) representa un aumento relativo de 74 por ciento en un período de 8 años, y un aumento relativo de 36 por ciento desde el año 2003”.[1]

Al ir creciendo en popularidad, la educación en el hogar ha sido el tema de más y más investigaciones sociales.[2] Estas investigaciones sociales y la experiencia práctica a nivel mundial indican que los estudiantes en casa se desarrollan hasta llegar a ser adultos preparados y socialmente integrados, y llegan a ser ciudadanos responsables quienes son miembros productivos de la sociedad.

De acuerdo a un sitio de Internet mantenido por Dr. Robert Kunzman, profesor de educación en Indiana University, más de mil quinientos artículos han sido escritos sobre la educación en el hogar desde el año 1919; la mayoría de ellos desde el año 1975.[3] El sitio de Dr. Kunzman muestra que casi 200 artículos han sido escritos sobre el rendimiento académico de estudiantes en casa. Tocando el tema de rendimiento académico, y así tratando con la objeción sobre la aptitud de maestros, varios investigadores han hecho encuestas a decenas de miles de estudiantes en casa, desde el año 1990. Estos trabajos incluyen un estudio de Dr. Brian Ray (1990), en ese tiempo catedrático en Seattle Pacific University, y Dr. Lawrence Rudman (1999), director de la asociación de exámenes y evaluaciones ERIC, y Dr. Ray nuevamente en los años 2000 y 2010 (Ray, 2000, 2010).[4] Estos estudios muestran que el rendimiento académico de estudiantes en casa en los exámenes estandarizados es generalmente de 25 a 35 puntos de percentil más alto que el promedio de estudiantes de las escuelas públicas.[5]

Dr. Brian Ray, un investigador por muchos años de la educación en el hogar y fundador de National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI) [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciónes de Educación en el Hogar] ha analizado varios de estos estudios y producido reportes sobre ellos. Estos reportes pueden ser obtenidos en el sitio de Internet de Home School Legal Defense Association (www.hslda.org/research). Interesantemente, los estudios de Dr. Ray también encontraron que no existe, o que existe una correlación mínima entre los credenciales o calificativos del maestro en casa y el rendimiento académico del niño. En esencia, esto significa que la madre que enseña en casa y no tiene un diploma de high school [escuela secundaria en Estados Unidos], y cualquier madre que enseña en casa que tiene un doctorado, o Ph.D., podrían, en promedio, alcanzar resultados similares. Los estudiantes que fueron enseñados por los dos tipos de madres obtuvieron de 25 a 35 puntos de percentil más que el promedio nacional representando a los estudiantes de las escuelas públicas.

Digno de ser mencionado entre su colección de investigaciones es el estudio de Brian Ray, del año 2004 Home Educated and Now Adults [Educados en el Hogar y Ahora Adultos].[6] Este estudio hizo encuestas a 5,254 adultos, de 18 a 24 años de edad, que fueron enseñados en casa, y encontró que los estudiantes en casa están involucrados en su comunidad, en civismo, y en educación superior en mayor medida que sus semejantes que fueron educados de manera tradicional. Por ejemplo, 50.2% de estudiantes en casa continúan con alguna forma de estudios universitarios, comparado con 34% de sus semejantes; 8.7% recibieron el título associates degree, comparado con 4.1% de sus semejantes, 11.8% recibieron el título bachelor’s degree comparado con 7.6% de sus semejantes, y 0.8% recibieron el título master’s degree, comparado con 0.3% de sus semejantes.

Además, 95% de los encuestados respondieron que o concordaban, o firmemente concordaban que estaban contentos con haber sido enseñados en casa, 92% concordaban, o firmemente concordaban que el haber sido enseñados en casa les dio ventajas en su vida adulta, 88% estaban en desacuerdo o en completo desacuerdo que la escuela en casa limitó sus oportunidades educativas, 94% estaban en desacuerdo o en completo desacuerdo que la escuela en casa limitó sus opciones de carrera profesional, y 82% concordaban, o firmemente concordaban que pondrían a sus propios hijos a estudiar en el hogar.

Los graduados de escuela en casa también están en el alto rango de involucramiento social y cívico. “Setentaiún por ciento de los encuestados estaban participando en alguna actividad continua de servicio comunitario (entrenando a un equipo deportivo, trabajando como voluntarios en una escuela, o trabajando con una asociación de iglesia o de vecindario), mientras 37% de los adultos estadounidenses de edades similares y 39% de todos los adultos estadounidenses lo estaban haciendo en 1996. Mientras 88% de estos estudiantes en casa encuestados eran miembros de alguna organización (por ejemplo, un grupo comunitario, iglesia o sinagoga, unión, grupo de educación en el hogar, u organización profesional), 50% de los adultos estadounidenses con edades similares y 59% de todos los adultos estadounidenses lo estaban haciendo en 1996”.[7] El estudio también reveló que los graduados de escuela en casa son más tolerantes de diferentes perspectivas que la población general, además de estar más involucrados cívicamente.[8]

Estos resultados no se limitan únicamente a este estudio. Investigaciones científicas y la experiencia a nivel mundial confirman estos descubrimientos. Otro estudio, presentado al Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association [la Sesión Anual de la Asociación de Investigaciones de Educación Americana] en 1995, observó a los estudiantes en casa que continuaron sus estudios en la universidad y descubrió que los estudiantes en casa frecuentemente son líderes en el campo universitario.[9] Este estudio observó a 60 estudiantes quienes fueron exclusivamente enseñados en casa en high school, y los comparó al resto de la población estudiantil de acuerdo a sesentaitrés parámetros. Los estudiantes en casa se llevaron el primer lugar en 43 de 63 parámetros. “Ya que muchos de los parámetros en los cuales los estudiantes en casa tomaron el primer lugar involucraban posiciones de liderazgo, Galloway concluyó que los estudiantes de escuela en casa eran fácilmente reconocidos por sus habilidades de liderazgo. Ella declaró, sin expresión, ‘Ellos son los líderes en el campus.’”[10]

Otros estudios demuestran los mismos resultados. Un estudio encontró que los niños que son enseñados en casa alcanzan punteos en el percentil 84 en socialización—un contraste con sus semejantes quienes alcanzaron punteos en el percentil 23—y concluyó que “los niños que se mantienen en casa son más maduros y están mejor socializados que los que son enviados a la escuela”.[11] Otro estudio no pudo encontrar que hubiera una falta de adaptación en los estudiantes en casa que fueron a la universidad, y notó que “parecen poder adaptarse de igual manera, o mejor, a la vida universitaria en una universidad cristiana que los estudiantes de primer año que fueron enseñados en escuelas tradicionales, medidos con las diferentes escalas de adaptación a la universidad”.[12] Otro estudio encontró que “Los estudiantes universitarios que fueron enseñados en casa previamente se hallaron significantemente más Agradables, Concienzudos, y Abiertos comparados con sus semejantes en las normas nacionales de edad de universidad”.[13]

En un artículo del año 2000, publicado en Peabody Journal of Education, Richard Medlin, catedrático de psicología en Setson University, quien enseña Psícología Infantil y Trastornos de Comportamiento Infantil, examinó las investigaciones sobre las habilidades sociales de los estudiantes en casa. En ninguno de los estudios que examinó encontró que los estudiantes en casa estuvieran atrasados comparados con sus semejantes educados de manera tradicional. Al contrario, él encontró que los niños enseñados en casa están muy involucrados en sus comunidades y vidas sociales:

A pesar de la creencia común que la escuela en casa es socialmente aisladora, las investigaciones documentan muy claramente que los niños enseñados en casa están muy involucrados en las rutinas sociales de sus comunidades. Ellos están involucrados en varios tipos de actividades con varias clases de personas. De hecho, el horario flexible y la mayor eficiencia en el uso de tiempo que la escuela en casa facilita, pueden permitir a los estudiantes en casa participar en más actividades extracurriculares que los niños que asisten a las escuelas convencionales.[14]

Él también encuentra que los estudiantes en casa están aprendiendo comportamiento social apropiado.

Las investigaciones confirman que los niños que estudian en casa están aprendiendo las reglas del comportamiento social apropiado y formando actitudes saludables hacia sí mismos. Su comportamiento social y autoestima ciertamente no son peores que los de aquellos niños que asisten a escuelas convencionales, y probablemente son mejores.[15]

Más recientemente, Medlin condujo otro estudio, y encontró que: “Los punteos de habilidades sociales de los niños enseñados en casa estaban consistentemente más altos que los de los niños de las escuelas públicas. Las diferencias fueron más marcadas en las niñas y en los niños mayores, y abarcaron las cuatro habilidades especificas en las cuales se examinaron: cooperación, asertividad, compasión, y autocontrol”,[16] y concluye que “por lo cual, parece existir una convergencia de evidencia de tres perspectivas diferentes—informes de padres, observadores objetivos, y autoinformes—las habilidades sociales de esos niños que estudian en casa son excepcionales.”[17] Los resultados de estos estudios se pueden aplicar de manera amplia. Aunque el número de estudiantes en casa en España aún es pequeño, ya ha habido unos pocos graduados de la escuela en casa, uno que está estudiando en la mejor escuela de medicina de España, Karolinska Insititutet, para ser doctor médico. Mientras continúa el crecimiento de la educación en el hogar en España, no existe razón para creer que otros niños españoles, educados en casa, van a madurar hasta llegar a ser ninguna otra cosa más que adultos bien desarrollados y socializados, quienes son contribuidores positivos a la sociedad española.

II. El Rendimiento Académico es Superior

Desde el año 1988, se ha conducido un gran número de estudios comparando el éxito de los estudiantes en casa con el de aquellos en el sistema de educación pública. Nuevamente, aunque las escuelas españolas y estadounidenses son diferentes, nuestras sociedades y nuestros hijos no son tan diferentes como para ignorar los encuentros substantivos de estos estudios. Estos incluyen estudios oficiales conducidos por el Departamento de Educación de Tennessee en 1988[18] y el Departamento de Educación de Oregon en 1999.[19]Adicionalmente, han habido al menos cinco estudios nacionales sobre el éxito de la escuela en el hogar, conducidos por investigadores profesionales[20], incluyendo a Lawrence Rudner, anteriormente el director de la asociación de exámenes y medidas de Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) [Centro de Información de Recursos de Educación], una biblioteca de investigaciones patrocinada por el Departamento de Educación de Estados Unidos. [21]

Todos estos estudios demuestran que la educación en el hogar produce punteos más altos en exámenes de rendimiento educativo que los punteos de los estudiantes de escuela pública. Los estudiantes en casa alcanzan, en promedio, entre 15 y 30 puntos de percentil más que los promedios de la escuela pública. Estos estudios revelan que esto es cierto en todos los grados escolares y materias. Estos estudios también consideran si depende o no el éxito académico de factores como la certificación de maestros, el nivel educativo de los padres, o el ingreso familiar. Las investigaciones muestran que no hay una correlación significativa entre la certificación de maestros y el éxito educativo en la escuela en el hogar. Los estudiantes en casa alcanzan resultados altos sin importar si sus padres poseen o no poseen un credencial de enseñanza del estado.[22]

Cuando el rendimiento de los estudiantes en casa es analizado de acuerdo al nivel educativo de sus padres (diploma de high school, algunos años de universidad, un título universitario, etc.) algunos estudios encuentran que existe una pequeña correlación entre la educación de los padres y el éxito del estudiante, mientras otros estudios no encuentran ninguna correlación.[23] Sin embargo, todos los estudios han encontrado que aun aquellos estudiantes cuyos padres tienen el nivel más bajo de trasfondo educativo, sacan punteos más altos que los promedios de las escuelas públicas.

En las escuelas públicas, sin embargo, hay una correlación fuerte entre el nivel educativo de los padres y el éxito del estudiante.[24] En las escuelas públicas, los hijos de familias con niveles altos de educación son los estudiantes de éxito; los estudiantes de familias con trasfondos educativos más bajos sacan punteos significativamente más bajos en los exámenes de rendimiento. No es así con la escuela en casa. Virtualmente no existe ninguna desigualdad entre los hijos de personas con niveles educativos altos comparados con los que tienen niveles más bajos de educación. Cada segmento de la comunidad que enseña en casa saca punteos materialmente más altos que los promedios de la escuela pública. Las escuelas públicas no pueden obtener los resultados alcanzados por las escuelas en casa.

Este mismo fenómeno se puede encontrar cuando los resultados educativos se dividen de acuerdo al ingreso familiar. Es trágico ver que en las escuelas públicas, los estudiantes que vienen de familias con un ingreso bajo tienen resultados significativamente más bajos que los estudiantes de familias con ingresos más altos.[25]

Por el contrario, los niños que estudian en casa en cada nivel de ingresos alcanzan resultados que son significativamente más altos que los promedios de la escuela pública. Además, en algunos estudios sobre los estudiantes en casa, no hay ninguna diferencia material en el rendimiento de hijos de las familias más pobres comparado con los hijos de las familias más afluentes.[26] Aunque algunos estudios muestran una diferencia marginal en el éxito de estudiantes en casa basado en un ingreso familiar, aun en estos casos, los estudiantes en los niveles de ingreso más bajos pueden rendir mucho más alto que los promedios de la escuela pública.[27]

Las escuelas públicas parecen no poder quebrantar el ciclo de rendimiento bajo para estudiantes de familias de un ingreso bajo. Pero la educación en el hogar ha demostrado que los niños de familias con un ingreso bajo tienen éxito; y los hijos de padres con niveles de educación más bajos también tienen éxito.

Finalmente, durante 10 años—desde el año 1996 hasta el año 2006—los estudiantes en casa también han sacado punteos más altos que el promedio en los exámenes de admisión a la universidad, tal como el examen ACT. En el año 2006, el ACT no siguió reportando los resultados de estudiantes en casa específicamente. En el año 2006, el punteo compuesto promedio de los estudiantes en casa fue 22.4, comparado con el promedio nacional de 21.1.[28] El punteo compuesto promedio de ACT en el año 2005 para los estudiantes en casa fue 22.5, comparado con el promedio nacional de 20.9. Parte de este rendimiento académico podría estar relacionado con el hecho que los niños estudiantes en casa manejan su tiempo en maneras radicalmente diferentes a sus contrapartes que estudian en escuelas públicas o privadas. En un estudio de estudiantes de cuarto grado, 0.1 por ciento de los niños que estudiaban en casa miraban seis horas o más de televisión diariamente, mientras 19 por ciento de los niños que estudiaban en las escuelas públicas miraban televisión en esta proporción tan asombrosa.[29]

Además, los estudios muestran que el promedio de graduados de escuela en casa demuestran éxito y se realizan igual de bien o mejor que el público general en todas las maneras de medir el éxito de los adultos. Estas medidas incluyen los porcentajes de ingreso en la universidad, de completar los estudios universitarios, de involucramiento cívico, y de servicio comunitario.[30]

Los Reportes Populares Concuerdan

El éxito de la educación en el hogar también ha sido demostrado por muchos otros indicadores populares de éxito. El estudiante universitario más joven del estado de California, el genio Moshe Kai Cavalin, de 10 años, fue educado en casa desde la edad de 6 años a la edad de 8 años. Después de esto sus padres decidieron que la universidad era el mejor lugar para él.[31]

Otra muestra del éxito de la escuela en el hogar son los concursos nacionales de ortografía y geografía que suceden anualmente en los Estados Unidos. Desde los años 1997 y 1999, cuando los estudiantes en casa ganaron por primera vez los concursos de ortografía y geografía respectivamente, los estudiantes en casa se han desempeñado bien consistentemente en estos concursos.

En el año 2007, el ganador del Concurso Nacional de Ortografía Scripps Howard fue Evan O’Dorney,[32] un estudiante en casa. De los concursantes que alcanzaron el nivel nacional ese año, 12.5 por ciento eran estudiantes en casa (a pesar de que los estudiantes en casa solo componían 2.9 por ciento de la población escolar en el año 2007[33]), y los estudiantes tomaron tres de seis de los lugares más altos.[34] En el año 2009, dos de los finalistas—incluyendo el subcampeón[35]—eran estudiantes en casa. [36] La ganadora del Concurso Nacional de Geografía 2007, Caitlin Snaring, era estudiante en el hogar, [37] y en los años 2005[38] y 2003[39] los estudiantes tomaron segundo lugar en el concurso de ortografía y ganaron el concurso de geografía. Cuatro de los seis finalistas más altos en el concurso de geografía 2002—incluyendo al ganador[40]—y al menos uno de los finalistas en el concurso de ortografía[41] también eran estudiantes en casa. En el año 2001 otra vez ganó un estudiante en casa el concurso de ortografía, [42] y otro tomó tercer lugar en el concurso de geografía.[43] Sin embargo, el año más exitoso fue el año 2000, cuando los estudiantes en casa tomaron los tres lugares más altos en ortografía[44], y cuatro de los diez lugares más altos en geografía.[45] En el año 1999 un estudiante en casa tomó tercer lugar en ortografía[46] y primero en geografía.[47] En total, los estudiantes en casa han sido cinco de los trece ganadores pasados del concurso de ortografía y cinco de los once ganadores pasados del concurso de geografía, además de más de treinta finalistas entre los dos concursos.

En el año 2002, tres equipos de escuela en casa fueron reconocidos nacionalmente por sus proyectos en el programa nacional del Día de Espacio, Desafíos de Diseño. Más de 400 proyectos de equipos de estudiantes de alrededor del mundo fueron presentados a la Fundación de Día de Espacio. Dieciocho equipos ganadores fueron escogidos, de los cuales cinco eran equipos de escuela en casa. El Senador de Estados Unidos y ex-astronauta John Glenn dio reconocimiento a los equipos en Washington D.C. en la Ceremonia de Apertura del Día del Espacio del 2 de Mayo.[48]

Los campeones académicos no son los únicos que han sido educados en casa. Tim Tebow, ganador del Trofeo Heisman 2007, fue enseñado en casa,[49] y de acuerdo a USA Today, “Las líneas de campeones de deportes de acción están llenas de graduados de escuela en casa como Shaun White, medallista de oro de X Juegos de snowboard, de 17 años de edad; James “Bubba” Stewart el campeón de motorcross, de 19 años de edad; y Kyle Strait[50], campeón de bicicleta de montaña, de 17 años de edad.” Shaun White continuó hasta ser medallista olímpico de oro en los juegos de Vancouver en el año 2010.[51]

Rendimiento Universitario

Los graduados de escuela en casa siguen edificando sobre su educación secundaria sólida cuando salen a la universidad. Información del estado de Colorado revela que “los análisis de rendimiento académico indican que los graduados de escuela en casa están tan preparados para la universidad como los graduados de escuelas secundarias tradicionales y que ellos se desempeñan tan bien en los exámenes universitarios de evaluación como los graduados de escuelas secundarias tradicionales.”[52] Otro estudio examinó los promedios de calificaciones y los exámenes de aptitud profesional y determinó que los graduados de la escuela en casa se desempeñan tan bien como los graduados de escuelas públicas y privadas. En el año 2004, la publicación Journal of College Admission publicó un artículo escrito por un director de admisión de Ball State University quien reportó que “las investigaciones muestran que nuestros estudiantes en casa tenían punteos más altos que el promedio en los exámenes SAT y ACT (1210 y 29 puntos respectivamente). También tienen un rendimiento más alto académicamente. Ellos tenían un promedio cumulativo de calificaciones de 3.47 [de 4.0 puntos posibles], comparado con el promedio de 2.91 de la población estudiantil general.”[53] Otro estudio encontró que el universitario de primer año que estudió en casa tenía un promedio de calificaciones un poco más alto, y punteos del examen SAT un poco más altos que los estudiantes de escuela pública y privada, y participaba en más actividades, y estaba satisfecho con su experiencia de estudio en casa.[54]

Además de lo académico, los estudiantes de escuela en casa están emocionalmente preparados para la universidad. Por ejemplo, un estudio que involucró a estudiantes de primer año en una universidad privada de artes liberales encontró que los estudiantes enseñados en casa reportaron “significativamente menos síntomas de ansiedad que un grupo similar de estudiantes enseñados tradicionalmente.”[55] Usando la escala de Adaptación a la Universidad (que mide problemas emocionales, de comportamiento, sociales, y académicos y es usado por los centros universitarios de consejería), los investigadores no encontraron otras diferencias significativas entre los dos grupos de estudiantes.

De acuerdo con eso, las universidades han reconocido el potencial de los estudiantes en casa. La publicación Chronicle of Higher Education ha reportado, tan temprano como hace una década que “más de 700 instituciones postsecundarias en los Estados Unidos, incluyendo Harvard University, Yale Univeristy, Stanford University, MIT, Rice University, y Citadel, aceptaron estudiantes en casa.”[56] Barmak Nassirian, director asociado ejecutivo de la Asociación Americana de Registradores Universitarios y Directores de Admisión explica: “Después de años de escepticismo, hasta desconfianza, muchos directores universitarios ahora están consientes que está en su mejor interés buscar estudiantes en casa.”[57] Algunos están activamente reclutando estudiantes en casa. “UC [Universidad de California] Riverside es la primera extensión de UC y una de las primeras universidades públicas de investigaciones en la nación que recluta estudiantes que fueron enseñados sobre la mesa de la cocina o en la carretera en vez de dentro de un aula. ‘Estos estudiantes están muy preparados para el trabajo a nivel universitario y están trabajando muy bien aquí,’ dijo Merlyn Campos, directora de admisión temporal.”[58] Regina Morin, directora de admisión en Columbia College en St. Louis, Missouri, dice que cada año la universidad mira a más estudiantes en casa presentar solicitudes de admisión. “Ellos tienden a ser mejores que sus contrapartes de escuelas públicas,” dice. “Ellos sacan punteos más altos en los exámenes que el promedio, ellos son más independientes, ellos frecuentemente están adelantados un grado.” [59]

La Educación en el Hogar es Efectiva para Estudiantes con Necesidades Especiales

Aunque los logros de los estudiantes en casa son muchos, sería absurdo argumentar que todos los estudiantes en casa se mantienen arriba del promedio. Claramente, el promedio de rendimiento académico de los estudiantes en casa es más alto cuando se compara a los promedios de las escuelas públicas y privadas. Sin embargo, existen muchos niños que tienen necesidades especiales de aprendizaje o incapacidades de aprendizaje quienes requieren instrucción individualizada y personalizada. Se han conducido estudios científicos que demuestran conclusivamente que los niños con necesidades especiales o incapacidades de aprendizaje prosperan en un ambiente de escuela en el hogar. Dr. Steven F. Duvall, catedrático asistente en College of Education for Leadership and Counseling en University of Idaho, ha conducido al menos tres estudios[60] que investigan específicamente la efectividad de la escuela en casa para los niños con necesidades especiales. En el año 2005, en uno de los estudios más exhaustivos que se ha conducido hasta el día de hoy sobre este tema,[61] Dr. Duvall descubrió que los padres, aunque no sean maestros certificados, pueden producir ambientes instructivos en el hogar que ayudan a los estudiantes que tienen incapacidades de aprendizaje a mejorar sus habilidades académicas, demostrando cómo beneficia la escuela en el hogar a los estudiantes con necesidades especiales.

En su estudio de un año que involucró a ocho estudiantes de escuela primaria y dos estudiantes de escuela intermedia con incapacidades de aprendizaje, Dr. Duvall comparó a un grupo de cinco estudiantes que recibían instrucción en su casa con un grupo de cinco estudiantes que asistían a las escuelas públicas. Él tuvo cuidado de escoger estudiantes de las escuelas públicas que correspondían a los estudiantes de escuela en casa de acuerdo al nivel de grado, sexo, cociente de inteligencia (IQ), y área de incapacidad. Dr. Duvall registró y analizó la cantidad de tiempo que los estudiantes estaban participando académicamente durante los períodos de instrucción. También les administró exámenes estandarizados de rendimiento para medir avances en lectura, matemática, e idioma escrito.

Sus resultados revelan varias ventajas singulares de la escuela en casa, tal como la participación mental y emocional con una materia, la atención individualizada de un instructor, y un aumento superior al promedio en habilidades. Los estudiantes con necesidades especiales que estudiaban en casa estaban participando académicamente aproximadamente dos veces y media más que los estudiantes con necesidades especiales en las escuelas públicas. Él encontró que los niños en las aulas de necesidades especiales de las escuelas públicas pasaban el 74.9 por ciento de su tiempo sin ninguna respuesta académica, mientras los niños que estudiaban en casa pasaban únicamente 40.7 por ciento de su tiempo sin ninguna respuesta académica. También encontró que las escuelas en casa tienen a los niños y a las maestras sentados lado a lado o cara a cara 43 por ciento del tiempo, mientras las aulas de educación pública tenían tales acomodaciones durante solo 6 por ciento del tiempo. Su estudio además demostró que los estudiantes de escuela en casa mostraron un promedio de seis meses de progreso en lectura comparado con solo medio mes de progreso en los estudiantes de escuela pública. Adicionalmente, durante el año, los estudiantes en casa con necesidades especiales demostraron ocho meses de progreso en habilidades de idioma escrito, comparado con sus contrapartes en la escuela pública quienes progresaron solo dos meses y medio, demostrando la tremenda ventaja que tiene la escuela en casa sobre la educación institucional para los estudiantes de escuela en casa.

III. La Educación en el Hogar es un Derecho Humano

En su obra de 3 volúmenes, Balancing Freedom, Autonomy, and Accountability in Education, Dr. Charles Glenn y Dr. Jan de Groof concuerdan con la decisión en el caso Pierce de la Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos que el derecho de los padres de guiar el desarrollo de sus hijos y de escoger la forma apropiada de educación para ellos es fundamental. Ellos escriben que “negar esa opción . . . es injusto e indigno de una sociedad libre”.[62] También hacen el recordatorio a sus lectores que el derecho fundamental de los padres a la libertad educativa es reconocido internacionalmente.[63] Un estudio de varios documentos fundamentales de los derechos humanos muestra que el derecho de los padres de controlar y dirigir la educación de sus hijos es un principio de la doctrina de derechos humanos y no solo es reconocido, sino también es superior en relación a las declaraciones del Estado en educar a los hijos.

El Artículo 26, parte 3 de La Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos de 1948 dice que “Los padres tendrán derecho preferente a escoger el tipo de educación que habrá de darse a sus hijos” (énfasis agregado). El hecho que la palabra “preferente” es usada indica la jerarquía y primacía del derecho de los padres en relación al Estado. En el Convenio Europeo para la Protección de los Derechos Humanos y de las Libertades Fundamentales de 1950, el Artículo 2 [bajo el protocolo adicional] permite que,

El Estado, en el ejercicio de las funciones que asuma en el campo de la educación y de la enseñanza, respetará el derecho de los padres a asegurar esta educación y esta enseñanza conforme a sus convicciones religiosas y filosóficas.

En 1966, La Asamblea General de Las Naciones Unidas abrió la puerta para aprobar el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales. El pacto entró en vigor en 1976. El Artículo 13.3 dice:

Los Estados Partes en el presente Pacto se comprometen a respetar la libertad de los padres [ . . .] de escoger para sus hijos o pupilos escuelas distintas de las creadas por las autoridades públicas, siempre que aquéllas satisfagan las normas mínimas que el Estado prescriba o apruebe en materia de enseñanza, y de hacer que sus hijos o pupilos reciban la educación religiosa o moral que esté de acuerdo con sus propias convicciones.

Aunque este pacto le permite al Estado crear ciertas “normas mínimas”, el pacto reafirma el reconocimiento por la Declaración de los derechos de los padres. Ese mismo año, el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos entró en vigor, proveyendo, en el Artículo 18, párrafo 4 que:

Los Estados Partes en el presente Pacto se comprometen a respetar la libertad de los padres y, en su caso, de los tutores legales, para garantizar que los hijos reciban la educación religiosa y moral que esté de acuerdo con sus propias convicciones.

Sin detenernos en detalles menores y sin analizar la gramática del significado de “garantizar . . . la educación . . . que esté de acuerdo con sus propias convicciones”, parece sumamente claro, como un principio fundamental, que el derecho de los padres de dirigir la educación de sus hijos es considerado un derecho humano que debe ser respetado por los Estados que profesan una lealtad a los derechos humanos establecidos en estos documentos.

Estados Unidos ha adoptado este principio en su ley y ha expresado que este principio se aplica a los estados desde 1925. En 1979, la Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos en el caso Parham v. J.R. expresó la filosofía perdurable de jurisprudencia Americana con respeto a la autonomía de los padres cuando escribió que “los padres aptos se consideran actuar conforme a los mejores intereses de sus hijos”.[64] En la ausencia de acciones contrarias, los padres tienen la libertad de tomar decisiones acerca de y por sus hijos sin la intrusión ni supervisión del gobierno. La Corte escribió elocuentemente:

Históricamente, nuestra jurisprudencia ha reflejado los conceptos, de la civilización Occidental, de la familia como una unidad con autoridad amplia de parte de los padres sobre los hijos menores de edad. Nuestros casos consistentemente han seguido ese curso; nuestro sistema constitucional rechazó hace mucho tiempo toda noción que un niño es “meramente una criatura del Estado” y, al contrario, afirmó que los padres generalmente “tienen el derecho, junto con el alto deber, de reconocer y preparar [a sus hijos] para obligaciones adicionales” . . . Ciertamente, esto incluye un “alto deber” de reconocer los síntomas de enfermedad y buscar y seguir el consejo médico. El concepto de la ley sobre la familia se basa en la suposición que los padres poseen lo que un niño carece en madurez, experiencia, y capacidad de buen juicio requerido para tomar las decisiones difíciles de la vida. Aun más importante, históricamente se ha reconocido que los lazos naturales del afecto guían a los padres a actuar por los mejores intereses de sus hijos [65](se omiten las referencias internas)

En virtualmente todas las naciones de Europa occidental, la educación en el hogar es tolerada o explícitamente permitida por la ley. Un gobierno que busca controlar la educación de los niños, contrario a la dirección de los padres, busca una forma inaceptable de dominio cultural y político, lo cual es el sello del totalitarismo.

Respondiendo a este tipo de política represiva en la República Federal de Alemania, un juez federal de inmigración de Estados Unidos concedió asilo político a una familia de estudiantes en casa de Alemania en enero del año 2010. El Juez Federal de Inmigración de Estados Unidos Lawrence O. Burman le confirió a una familia de Alemania asilo político basado en que ellos fueron perseguidos porque eran miembros de un grupo social específico—estudiantes en casa. Se ha reportado que el Juez Burman dijo:

Los estudiantes en casa son un grupo social específico que el gobierno Alemán intenta suprimir. Esta familia tiene un temor bien fundamentado de persecución . . . por tanto, son candidatos para el asilo . . . y la corte les concederá asilo. [66]

Los abogados de la familia publicaron un documento de prensa declarando lo siguiente:

En su sentencia, Burman dijo que lo más atemorizante de este caso fue el motivo del gobierno. Él notó que parecía que en vez de preocuparse por el bienestar de los niños, el gobierno estaba tratando de acabar con las sociedades paralelas—algo que el juez llamó “raro” y sencillamente “absurdo”. En su orden judicial, el juez expresó preocupación que aunque Alemania es un país democrático y es un aliado, él notó que esta política específica de perseguir a los estudiantes en casa es “repelente a todo lo que creemos como Americanos”. [67]

CONCLUSIÓN

En los últimos treinta años que la educación en el hogar ha crecido en popularidad en Estados Unidos, junto con el crecimiento simultáneo mundial durante la última década, se ha conducido una amplia variedad de investigaciones tratando con la socialización y lo académico. En todo, la educación en el hogar alcanza el estándar establecido por las escuelas públicas y virtualmente todas las investigaciones demuestran que los estudiantes en casa sobrepasan por mucho ese estándar. De acuerdo con esto, la suposición que la escuela en casa no satisface las necesidades de desarrollo de los niños—ya sea socialmente o académicamente—no puede ser comprobada a la luz de la evidencia. La educación en el hogar debe ser considerada en su propio derecho una forma equivalente de educación en el peor de casos, y en muchas maneras, superior a la que es provista en las escuelas públicas.

Cuando el Estado impone su autoridad para invalidar las decisiones de sus padres-ciudadanos en cuanto a la elección de educación para sus hijos, surge el conflicto. La idea que el Estado debe hacer cumplir el “derecho del niño a la educación” en oposición a las determinaciones de los padres, queda en marcado contraste con las normas internacionales de derechos humanos como fueron expresadas por las convenciones importantes de derechos humanos. Estos documentos internacionales de derechos humanos muestran el derecho preferente de los padres de determinar la naturaleza de la educación de sus hijos. De esta manera, cuando un tribunal en una democracia Occidental dicta que el Estado tiene igual derecho a la educación de los niños, eso demuestra que está operando fuera de las normas de los derechos humanos establecidos internacionalmente.

El argumento que el pluralismo le requiere al estado ejercitar una forma de totalitarismo en la educación es ilógico. Decir que es la responsabilidad del Estado asegurar la existencia y la continuación de la sociedad libre por lo cual debe asegurar, forzosamente si es necesario, que ciertos valores sean “fomentados” a través de la educación obligatoria dirigida por el gobierno es argumentar a favor de la expansión del gobierno, dándole poder a costo de la libertad de sus ciudadanos.

La experiencia robusta y de muchos años de Estados Unidos con la educación en el hogar ha mostrado que la educación en el hogar puede producir resultados académicos superiores y que los niños que son educados en casa no sólo se socializan bien sino también tienen una mejor mentalidad cívica que sus semejantes en otros ambientes educativos. Los niños enseñados en casa son demostrablemente productivos y miembros colaboradores de una sociedad libre y pluralista. En una sociedad pluralista, las personas deben ser permitidas tener diferentes sistemas de valores. Argumentar lo contrario es argumentar en contra del entendimiento fundamental del pluralismo y favorecer el totalitarismo.

Esto no quiere decir que el Estado no puede legítimamente servir en ninguna función de regulación o supervisión. Pero eliminar completamente la libertad de los padres de enseñar demuestra una actitud dura y totalitaria que no se conforma a la doctrina internacional moderna de los derechos humanos, representando, como ciertamente lo hace, los ideales de una sociedad libre.



[1] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007, NCES 2009–030, December 2008, at http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2009/2009030.pdf.

[2] Tanya K. Dumas, Sean Gates, & Deborah Schwarz, “Evidence for Homeschooling: Constitutional Analysis in Light of Social Science Research,” Widener Law Review (forthcoming), draft available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1317439.

[3] Robert Kinsman, Homeschooling Research & Scholarship, http://www.indiana.edu/~homeeduc/research_homepage.html (accessed May 17, 2011).

[4] Brian D. Ray, “Home schooling: The ameliorator of negative influences on learning?”Peabody Journal of Education, 75, No. 1/2 (2000): 71-106. See also Brian D. Ray, “Academic Achievement and Demographic Traits of Homeschool Students: A Nationwide Study,” Academic Leadership Journal, 8, No. 1, (2010) http://www.academicleadership.org/emprical_research/Academic_Achievement_and_Demographic_Traits_of_Homeschool_Students_A_Nationwide_Study.shtml (Accessed February 10, 2010). And see Lawrence M. Rudner, “Scholastic Achievement and Demographic Characteristics of Home School Students in 1998,” Educational Policy Analysis Archives, 7, No. 8 (1999), http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/viewFile/543/666 (Accessed January 21, 2010).

[5] Home School Legal Defense Association and Brian Ray, “Home School Progress Report 2009: Academic Achievement and Demographics,” (2009), see http://www.hslda.org/docs/study/ray2009/2009_Ray_StudyFINAL.pdf.

[6] Brian D. Ray Home educated and now adults: Their community and civic involvement, views about homeschooling, and other traits (Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute, 2004).

[7] Id. 48, internal citations omitted.

[8] Id. 48-49.

[9] Rhonda A. Galloway, “Home Schooled Adults: Are They Ready for College?,” in American Educational Research Association (San Francisco: 1995), available at http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/14/0a/d0.pdf.

[10] Richard G. Medlin, the Question of Socialization, Peabody Journal of Education 75(1 & 2), 107-123, 117, (2000).

[11] Thomas C. Smedley, Socialization of Home School Children, Home School Researcher 8(3), 9-16, (1992).

[12] Scott White, et al., Emotional, Social & Academic Adjustment to College: A Comparison Between Christian Home Schooled & Traditionally Schooled College Freshman, Home School Researcher 17(4), 1-7, (2007).

[13] Scott White, Megan Moore, and Josh Squires, Examination of Previously Homeschooled College Students with the Big Five Model of Personality, Home School Researcher 25(1), 1-7, (2009).

[14] Medlin 2000, 112-113 supra.

[15] Id., 116

[16] Richard G. Medlin, Homeschooled Children’s Social Skills, Home School Researcher 17(1), 1-8, (2006).

[17] Id.

[18] Tennessee Department of Education. Tennessee statewide averages, home school student test results, Stanford Achievement Test, grades 2, 5, 7 and 9 (Nashville, TN, 1988).

[19] Oregon Department of Education, Office of Student Services, Annual report of home school statistics 1998-99 (Salem, OR. May 20, 1999).

[20] Brian D. Ray, Academic Achievement and Demographic Traits of Homeschool Students: A Nationwide Study, Academic Leadership Live: The Online Journal, 8 no. 1 (February 2010), available at http://www.academicleadership.org/emprical_research/Academic_Achievement_and_Demographic_Traits_of_Homeschool_Students_A_Nationwide_Study.shtml; Brian D. Ray, A nationwide study of home education: Family characteristics, legal matters, and student achievement (Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute, 1990); Research Project. Home School Researcher, 6(4), 1-7; (1990); Deani Van Pelt. The choices families make: Home schooling in Canada comes of age, Frasier Forum, March 2004, available at http://www.fraserinstitute.org/Commerce.Web/product_files/The%20Choices%20Families%20Make~~%20Home%20Schooling%20in%20Canada%20Comes%20of%20Age-Mar04ffpelt.pdf.

[21] Lawrence M. Rudner, Scholastic achievement and demographic characteristics of home school students in 1998, Educational Policy Analysis Archives, 7(8). (1999). available at http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v7n8/.

[22] Jennie F. Rakestraw, Home schooling in Alabama, Home School Researcher, 4(4), 1, 5 (1988); Brian D. Ray 1990, 13, 38 supra; Brian D. Ray, Home schooling: The ameliorator of negative influences on learning? Peabody Journal of Education 75(1 & 2), 71, 83, 90 (2000); Howard B. Richman, William Girten, & Jay Snyder, Academic achievement and its relationship to selected variables among Pennsylvania homeschoolers, Home School Researcher, 6(4), 9, 13, (1990); Rudner 1999, Table 3.11 supra.

[23] Joan Ellen Havens, A study of parent education levels as they relate to academic achievement among home schooled children. Doctoral (Ed.D.) dissertation, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth TX (1991), 92-97; Brian D. Ray, Home education in Oklahoma: Family characteristics, student achievement, and policy matters, National Home Education Research Institute (Salem, OR, 1992), 25; Rudner 1999, Table 3.12: “It is worthy to note that, at every grade level, the mean performance of home school students whose parents do not have a college degree is much higher than the mean performance of students in public schools. Their [homeschooled] percentiles are mostly in the 65th to 69th percentile range.”

[24] Gary Neil Marks, Are father's or mother's socioeconomic characteristics more important influences on student performance? Recent international evidence. Social Indicators Research, 85(2), 293-309, (January 2008).

[25] James S. Coleman & Thomas Hoffer, Public and private high schools: The impact of communities Chapter 5 (New York, NY: Basic Books, Inc, 1987); Gordon Dahl & Lance Lochner, The impact of family income on child achievement. Discussion Paper No. 1305-05, Institute for Research on Poverty, 2005 available at http://www.eric.ed.gov/; Catherine E. Snow, Wendy S. Barnes, Jean Chandler, Irene F. Goodman, & Lowry Hemphill, Unfulfilled expectations: Home and school influences on literacy 2-3 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991).

[26] Ray 2000, 83-90 supra; Terry Russell, Cross-validation of a multivariate path analysis of predictors of home school student academic achievement, Home School Researcher, 10(1), 9, (1994).

[27] Rudner 1999, Table 3.10 supra; Jon Wartes, The relationship of selected input variables to academic achievement among Washington's homeschoolers. (Woodinville, WA, September 1990), 79, 122.

[28] Once Again Home-schoolers Score High on the ACT Exam, HSLDA, July 31, 2007, available at http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/hslda/200707310.asp.

[29] Rudner 1999, Table 2.10 supra.

[30] Clive R Belfield, Home-schoolers: How well do they perform on the SAT for college admission? in Bruce S. Cooper (Ed.), Home schooling in full view: A reader (Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing; Galloway, 2005), 167-177; Rhonda A. Galloway & Joe P. Sutton, Home schooled and conventionally schooled high school graduates: A comparison of aptitude for and achievement in college English, Home School Researcher, 11(1), 1-9 (1995); Paul Jones & Gene Gloeckner, First-Year College Performance: A Study of Home School Graduates & Traditional School Graduates, Journal of College Admission 183 (Spr. 2004), at 17, 20; Ray 2004, supra.

[31] John Rogers, 10-year-old scholar takes Calif. college by storm, AP News, May 14, 2008, available at http://apnews.myway.com/article/20080514/ D90LCS4G0.html.

[32] California Boy Wins National Spelling Bee,” CBS News, May 31, 2007, available at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/05/31/national/main2873184.shtml.

[33] U.S. Department of Education, 2008 supra.

[34] Richard Sousa , On Education: Home-schooling is a viable alternative to public schools, San Francisco Chronicle, June 11, 2007, available at http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/06/11/ EDGKOP3DE31.DTL&hw=subject%3Dedu+subject%3Deducation&sn=150&sc=153.

[35] Homeschooler takes second place in national spelling bee, Washington DC Examiner, May 29, 2009, available at http://www.examiner.com/x-4291-Baltimore-Christian-Conservative-Examiner~y2009m5d29-Homeschooler-takes-second-place-in-national-spelling-bee.

[36] Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee website, 2009 Results, available at http://public.spellingbee.com/public/results/2009/finishers/html; Homeschooler takes second place in national spelling bee, Washington DC Examiner, May 29, 2009, available at http://www.examiner.com/x-4291-Baltimore-Christian-Conservative-Examiner~y2009m5d29-Homeschooler-takes-second-place-in-national-spelling-bee.

[37] Scott Norris, Girl Wins Geographic Bee – First in 17 Years, National Geographic News, May 23, 2007, available at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/05/070523-geo-bee.html.

[38] Californian wins National Spelling Bee with ‘appoggiatura’, USA Today, June 1, 2005, available at http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-06-01-spelling-bee_x.htm; Ten Students Win Places in National Geographic Bee Final, National Geographic News, May 24, 2005, available at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/05/0524_050524_beefinals.html; National Geographic, Past National Geographic Bee Winners, at http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographybee/ past_winners.html (n.d.).

[39] Eighth-grader from Dallas wins spelling bee, CNN.com, May 30, 2003, at http://edition.cnn.com/2003/EDUCATION/05/29/spelling.bee.ap/index.html; National Geographic, 2003 Winner: James Williams, at http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographybee/2003.html (n.d.).

[40] Mary Pride, What We Can Learn from the Home-schooled 2002 National Geography Bee Winners, Practical Home-schooling # 48, 2002, available at http://www.home-school.com/Articles/phs48-geobee.html.

[41] Colo. student wins spelling bee with ‘prospicience’, USA Today, May 31, 2002, available at http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2002/05/30/ spelling-bee.htm.

[42] Minnesota Boy Is Spelling Champ, CBS News, May 31, 2001, available at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2001/05/31/national/main294239.shtml?source=search_story.

[43] Rich Jefferson, Home schooler wins third place in National Geography Bee, NCHE, May 23, 2001, http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/hslda/ 200105231.asp.

[44] Home Schoolers Making Headlines, NCHE, June 22, 2000, http://www.hslda.org/docs/nche/000002/00000254.asp.

[45] National Geographic, “2000 Finalists,” http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographybee/2000_semi.html.

[46] Jefferson 2001, supra.

[47] NCHE 2000, supra.

[48] California Home Schoolers Recognized in Space Day Competition, HSLDA News, July 8, 2002, at http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/hslda/ 200207080.asp.

[49] One-of-a-kind Tebow becomes first sophomore to win Heisman, AP article, December 10, 2007 available at http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=ncf&id=3148445.

[50] Sal Ruibal, Elite take home-school route, USA TODAY, June 7, 2005, available at http://www.usatoday.com/sports/preps/2005-06-07-home-school-cover_x.htm.

[51] Vancouver Olympics 2010 website, athlete profile of Shaun White, available at http://www.vancouver2010.com/olympic-snowboard/athletes/shaun-white_ath1023740ln.html.

[52] Jones & Gloeckner, 2004.

[53] Gary Mason, Homeschool Recruiting: Lessons Learned on the Journey, Journal of College Admission 185 (Fall 2004), at 2.

[54] Erika M. L. Jones, Transition from Home Education to Higher Education: Academic and Social Issues, Home School Researcher 25(3), 1-9, (2010).

[55] White, et al., 2007, supra.

[56] Paula Wasley, Home-Schooled Students Rise in Supply and Demand, The chronicle of Higher Education 54(7), 1, (Oct. 12, 2007); see also Patrick Basham, John Merrifield & Claudia R. Hepburn, Home Schooling: From The Extreme To The Mainstream, 2nd ed 6, The Fraser Institute 2007, available at http://www.fraserinstitute.org/COMMERCE.WEB/product_files/Homeschooling2.pdf.Basham at 15.

[57] Alan Scher Zagier, Colleges Coveting Home-Schooled Students, AP, September 30, 2006, available at http://www.boston.com/news/nation/ articles/2006/09/30/colleges_coveting_home_schooled_students/.

[58] Elaine Regus, UC Riverside a leader in courting home-schooled students, The Press-Enterprise, November 23, 2007, available at http://www.pe.com/ localnews/highereducation/stories/PE_News_Local_D_home-school24.3085ff7.html.

[59] Georgina Gustin, Home-school numbers growing, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, October 3, 2007, available at http://forum.gon.com/ showthread.php?t=141756.

[60] Duvall, Steven F., Delquadri, Joseph C., & Ward, D. Lawrence. (2004). A preliminary investigation of the effectiveness of homeschool instructional environments for students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]. School Psychology Review, 33(1), 140-158.

Duvall, Steven F., Ward, D. Lawrence, Delquadri, Joseph C., & Greenwood, Charles R. (1997). An exploratory study of home school instructional environments and their effects on the basic skills of students with learning disabilities. Education and Treatment of Children, 20(2), 150-172.

[61] _________. (2005). The effectiveness of homeschooling students with special needs. In Bruce S. Cooper (Ed.), Home schooling in full view: A reader, p. 151-166. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.

[62] Charles Glenn and Jan De Groof, Balancing Freedom, Autonomy and Accountability in Education, (Nijmegen, Netherlands: Wolf Legal Publishers, 2005), 1.

[63] Glenn and de Groof, 6.

[64] Parham v. J.R. 442 U.S. 584, 600.

[65] Parham v. J.R. 442 U.S. 584, 600. Internal citations: Pierce v. Society of Sisters, 268 U. S. 510, 268 U. S. 535 (1925). See also Wisconsin v. Yoder, 406 U. S. 205, 406 U. S. 213 (1972); Prince v. Massachusetts, 321 U. S. 158, 321 U. S. 166 (1944); Meyer v. Nebraska, 262 U. S. 390, 262 U. S. 400 (1923), 1 W. Blackstone, Commentaries *447; 2 J. Kent, Commentaries on American Law *190

[66] Home School Legal Defense Association, “Homeschooling Family Granted Political Asylum: Immigration Judge Says Germany Violating Basic Human Rights” (January 26, 2010), http://www.hslda.org/hs/international/Germany/201001260.asp (accessed May 16, 2011).

[67] Ibid.




Michael Donnelly, Esq. ,

Home School Legal Defense Association

P.O. Box 3000

Purcellville, VA 20134

(540) 338-5600

Fax: (540) 338-1952

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada